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Environmental justice assessment notices

The Healthy Environment for All Act (HEAL Act) requires specific state agencies to conduct an environmental justice assessment for significant agency actions.

  • The development and adoption of significant legislative rules as defined in RCW 34.05.328.
  • The development and adoption of any new grant or loan program that the agency is explicitly authorized or required by statute to implement.
  • A capital project, grant, or loan award costing at least $12,000,000.
  • A transportation project, grant, or loan costing at least $15,000,000.
  • The submission of agency request legislation to the Office of the Governor or OFM for approval.

An environmental justice assessment is a process to:

  • identify and assess the impacts of a significant agency action on overburdened communities, vulnerable populations, and Tribes;
  • solicit community and tribal input in the development of the action and on options to mitigate, reduce or eliminate harms and equitably distribute benefits associated with the action;
  • report on how the agency did or did not modify the action based upon community and tribal input.

The goal of an EJ assessment is to help a state agency make decisions and to assist with:

  • equitably distributing environmental benefits;
  • reducing environmental harms;
  • identifying and reducing environmental and health disparities through the implementation of the action.

Agencies covered by the HEAL Act or who have opted in to the HEAL Act requirements include these departments:

  • Agriculture (WSDA)
  • Commerce
  • Ecology
  • Health (DOH)
  • Natural Resources (DNR)
  • Transportation (WSDOT)
  • Office of the Attorney General
  • Puget Sound Partnership (PSP)

Under RCW 70A.02.090 each covered agency must file a notice with us of significant agency actions for which the agency is initiating an environmental justice assessment. We prepare a list of all filings received from covered agencies each week to post here every Friday.

Below is list of state agency environmental justice assessments that you can filter by agency or type of action, or use the search bar to find certains terms. Select the "+" symbol for desciptions of the action, how the public can provide input, and a link to the EJ assessment when completed.

Date submitted Date initiatedsort ascending Date completed Agency Type Agency action Description Methods for providing public comment Published EJ assessment
06/27/2024 06/27/2024 Ongoing Health, Department of Significant legislative rules Primary and Secondary School Environmental Health and Safety Standards The State Board of Health (Board), in collaboration with the Department of Health (Department) is conducting an Environmental Justice Assessment for proposed rules regulating environmental health and safety standards for K-12 schools. This rulemaking is required by a budget proviso that was included in the Washington State 2024 supplemental operating budget, (Section 222, subsection 159, page 492). The new chapter will establish updated, minimum statewide health and safety standards for schools and formalize school environmental health and safety inspection procedures. Topics that may be addressed in proposed rules are: • Indoor air quality including heating, cooling, and ventilation • Water quality • Noise • Moisture and mold • Lighting • Restrooms/showers • Playgrounds • Laboratory and shop safety • Sewage • Food safety ~ May 2024: Invite Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Members - The proviso named specific organizations to work in collaboration with the Board to update the rules as part of a technical advisory committee (TAC). A full list of required representatives can be found on the agency webpage linked. The Board will include additional members such as Parent-Teacher Organizations, Teachers Unions, Students, and private schools. ~ Aug 2024 – Nov 2024: TAC Meetings - Work with members of the TAC to draft rule language and discuss implementation. TAC meetings are open to the public and everyone is welcome to join. ~ Dec 2024: Focus Groups- Virtual and in-person meetings will be held to discuss preliminary draft language to help the Board rulemaking team make informed decisions about finalized draft rule language. These meetings will take place across Washington state. All members of the public are welcome to participate in these focus groups. ~ Dec 2024: Informal Comment Period - Invite all interested parties to review and share feedback on the draft rule language. All members of the public are welcome to provide comments during the informal comment period.
07/11/2024 06/25/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of Agency-request legislation WSBO Program Update, including SBO Goals Update and Transfer of the administrative duties for the Digital Equity Forum to the Office of Equity This Agency Request Legislation will accomplish two things. First, to formally move the administration of the Digital Equity Forum to the Office of Equity. Second, we also plan to update WSBO goals in RCW 43.330.536 to better align with the current work in PWB, CERB and the SBO. Input for this ARL can be provided using our public comment form. https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/78649f9ca0b74d35854a7e817bd0e349
07/19/2024 06/24/2024 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Amending the fees that support the Fruit & Vegetable Inspection Program in chapter 16-390 WAC. Increases Fruit & Vegetable Program fees and revises the fee schedule to more accurately reflect the scope of services provided, including but not limited to adding fees for services that are not specifically identified in current rule. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
06/14/2024 06/14/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of Other Home Rehabilitation Grant Program Department of Commerce administered the Home Rehabilitation Loan Program (HRLP). In 2023 the Legislature passed substitute HB 1250, mandating Commerce to go through the rule process and convert HRLP from a loan program to a grant program. Commerce will participate in a Tribal briefing, release a Request for Information and hold virtual stakeholder input meetings.
06/13/2024 06/13/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Other Potential linkage of Washington’s Cap-and-Invest carbon market with the joint California-Québec carbon market As required by the Climate Commitment Act (CCA), Ecology is investigating the option of linking Washington’s Cap-and-Invest carbon market with the California-Québec carbon market. Through linkage, Washington’s carbon market would combine with the joint California-Québec market to create a single shared market with joint allowance auctions and a common allowance price across all jurisdictions. Allowances could be traded across jurisdictions and used to cover emissions in any of the three jurisdictions. The law also requires Ecology to evaluate specific criteria to ensure linkage would benefit Washington’s communities, economy, and climate goals. Ecology is pursuing linkage with California and Québec based on a preliminary analysis that joining a larger carbon market will lead to lower and more consistent allowance prices, benefitting businesses and consumers in Washington. This Environmental Justice Assessment is separate from the Environmental Justice Assessment being conducted on the Cap-and-Invest Linkage Rulemaking. Additionally, Ecology previously conducted an Environmental Justice Assessment on the 2024 carbon market linkage agency request legislation (Senate Bill 6058). We will consider input received through those other linkage related Environmental Justice Assessments in this Assessment. While the completion of each of these Environmental Justice Assessments is a separate legal obligation, Ecology intends to approach them as a comprehensive, iterative process of engagement and consultation that will continually inform our awareness and understanding of potential impacts as well as potential methods to minimize or eliminate harms and maximize benefits for vulnerable populations and overburdened communities. All of these processes must be complete before Ecology can sign a linkage agreement. Ecology plans to conduct public engagement starting in summer 2024, with outreach focused on people from overburdened communities, vulnerable populations, and Tribes, for the purpose of developing this Environmental Justice Assessment. Ecology will provide a variety of ways for the public to provide input to inform this Environmental Justice Assessment, including: online public meetings, individual and small group meetings with interested parties, and online public comments. We will also reach out to groups with an environmental and environmental justice focus and community-based groups by email and phone to see if they would like to provide input for this assessment. We will also ask if groups are hosting meetings that Ecology can participate in to share information, answer questions, and continue to gather input. As we schedule opportunities for feedback and participation, we will share them through our website and email distribution list. Visit the linkage webpage at cca.wa.gov/linkage for updates or email us at CCALinkage@ecy.wa.gov with comments or questions.
06/05/2024 06/05/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of New grant or loan program Improving Air Quality in Overburdened Communities Grants Program Section 3 of the Climate Commitment Act, RCW 70A.65.020, requires Ecology to take actions to reduce criteria air pollutant emissions in identified overburdened communities highly impacted by air pollution. To help meet these reduction requirements, Ecology is developing and implementing a new grant program to incentivize and support the reduction of non-regulated sources of criteria pollutant emissions in communities identified to be overburdened and highly impacted by air pollution. Ecology will lead an inclusive outreach effort to engage with Tribes, local municipalities, and non-governmental organizations in these communities to seek input on the design of the grant program. $10M will be available to organizations severing these communities to engage with people in their community towards the goal of identifying and developing local projects to improve air quality. Reducing criteria air pollution will improve air quality and protect public health in overburdened and highly impacted communities and will help to reduce environmental and health disparities. This grant program is supported with funding from Washington’s Climate Commitment Act (CCA). We will use a variety of methods to engage with people from overburdened communities and vulnerable populations to inform this work, including inviting formal consultation with Tribes and a virtual listening session for Tribal members and staff; virtual listening sessions for organizations serving overburdened communities, including community groups and local municipalities; an online public comment period; as possible, direct outreach and education, including tabling at community events and attending existing community meetings; web content; and GovDelivery distribution list. Outreach and engagement efforts will occur in May and June 2024 and focus on the communities Ecology identified as overburdened and highly impacted by air pollution and Tribes.
06/27/2024 05/30/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Washington Families Clean Energy Credits Grant Program The Washington Families Clean Energy Credits Grant Program dedicates $150 million to assist low- and moderate-income households with the clean energy transition. This initiative will offer bill credits of $200 per income qualified household to eligible residential customers through their electric utility provider.The Department of Commerce will distribute grants to all utility companies in Washington, enabling them to pass on $200 bill credits to customer accounts by September 15, 2024. March - September 2024: Community Meetings (as guest) Email comments OTHER Print Media Web-based comment form A call center may be supported and furnished with Commerce's administrative funding. However, this has not yet established in contract.
05/22/2024 05/22/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Cosmetic Products Rulemaking The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) started a rulemaking to develop a new chapter in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC): Chapter 173-339 WAC—Cosmetic Products Restrictions. Ecology is conducting this rulemaking to: • Make cosmetics safer for consumers and the environment. • Reduce consumers’ and workers’ exposure to formaldehyde. • Address the disproportionate harms caused by cosmetic products in overburdened communities and vulnerable populations. • Reduce the amount of formaldehyde entering the environment. Under the authority of Chapter 70A.560 RCW (Toxic-Free Cosmetics Act), Ecology may adopt a rule that identifies chemicals used in cosmetic products that release formaldehyde (formaldehyde releasers) and adopt restrictions for the identified formaldehyde releasers. This rule may include: • Restrictions that apply to the use of specified formaldehyde releasers used in cosmetic products. • Allowances for products currently in the chain of commerce—stockpiled or available for purchase. • Compliance schedules. • Definitions of key terms such as “intentionally added.” • Other requirements or restrictions allowed by law. Background People use cosmetic products every day to clean their bodies or alter their appearance. Cosmetic products include items such as makeup, perfume, shampoo, hair gels, body wash, deodorant, hand lotion, and shaving cream. These products can contain chemicals that are toxic to people and the environment. In the Chemicals in Cosmetics Used by Washington Residents report (January, 2023), Ecology and the Department of Health found that many cosmetic products contain toxic chemicals. Some products disproportionately marketed to women of color, such as hair relaxers and skin lightening creams, often contain toxic chemicals. Some chemicals used in cosmetic products release formaldehyde, which exposes people to the chemical when they use the product. Formaldehyde can cause cancer, harm brain function, increase the risk of asthma, and irritate eyes and skin. Exposure can also lead to allergic reactions. Cosmetic products also can release formaldehyde into indoor and outdoor air. Formaldehyde can also enter wastewater streams as products are washed down the drain. In 2023, Washington state adopted Chapter 70A.560 RCW to ensure the safety of cosmetic products and protect Washington residents from toxic exposure. The law: • Restricts the manufacture, sale, and distribution of cosmetic products containing nine chemicals or chemical classes. • Directs Ecology to assess the hazards of chemicals or chemical classes that can provide the same or similar function as the restricted chemicals or chemical classes and make that information available to the public. • Directs Ecology to implement initiatives to support small businesses that manufacture cosmetic products, and to support independent cosmetologists and small businesses that provide cosmetology services in efforts to transition to safer cosmetic products. • Authorizes Ecology to adopt a rule that restricts the use of specified formaldehyde releasers in cosmetic products. We plan to conduct engagement for this rulemaking starting this summer and into the winter of 2024. Engagement efforts may include public meetings, a focus group, outreach with community-based organizations, opportunities to review and comment on draft rule requirements, public comment periods, and formal public hearings. We will focus on engaging with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations most impacted by formaldehyde releasers in cosmetic products. We will also invite consultation from Tribes who may additionally be interested in informing the development of this work. As this work continues to develop, we will share details about engagement opportunities and resources on our website and through our email distribution list. For more information, sign up for email announcements, visit our rulemaking webpage, or contact Stacey Callaway, rulemaking lead, at ToxicFreeCosmetics@ecy.wa.gov or 360-584-5661. As we schedule additional opportunities to provide feedback and participate in workshops, we will share details on our webpages and via our email list. We anticipate: • Developing draft rule requirements in the summer of 2024. Our next webinar will occur on June 11, 2024. See our events listing webpage for more information. Use our online comment form to provide feedback on draft rule requirements, the rulemaking process, and our efforts to implement Chapter 70A.560 RCW. • Proposing a formal draft rule, providing a public comment period, and hosting hearings, in the fall and winter of 2024. • Adopting the revised rule in the spring or summer of 2025.
05/10/2024 05/10/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Distribution of the Community Reinvestment Account: Reentry Services This new grant expands the existing Reentry Grant Program that provides reentry services to justice- involved individuals who have recently exited or are in the process of exiting incarceration. Advisory Groups Community Meetings (as guest), Focus Group, GovDelivery, Office Hours posted on the Department of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project website, Email through Dept of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project Website, Steering Committee.
05/02/2024 05/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Chapters 173-18, -20, -22, -26, and -27 WAC, Shoreline Management Act Rules Update The Department of Ecology is conducting rulemaking to amend Chapters 173-18, -20, -22, -26, and -27 under the Shoreline Management Act. These Chapters contain Ecology’s rules that carry out the provisions of the Shoreline Management Act. This includes the guidelines for local governments developing, amending, and administering shoreline master programs (SMPs) and standards for SMP administration, permitting, and enforcement. During this rulemaking, we will amend each of these WACs to ensure that our rules are current, reflect changes to the Shoreline Management Act, and clearly and efficiently guide local governments in upholding the goals of the Act. The scope of this rulemaking will be refined through the public engagement process but will include sea level rise. Some of the other topics we are considering may include shoreline stabilization, critical area protections, channel migration zones, mooring buoys, and more. Ecology is amending Chapter 173-26 and 173-27 WAC to: • Comply with the Shoreline Management Act (Chapter 90.58 RCW) and address issues that have we have identified through the review, adoption, and implementation of SMPs. These revisions will provide clarity around SMP approval/amendment procedures and permit and enforcement procedures. Additional amendments may be included for clarity. • Add requirements for local governments to address the impact of sea level rise and increased storm severity on people, property, and shoreline natural resources and the environment. Ecology is also amending Chapters 173-18 and -20 WAC, to update the list of streams, rivers, and lakes in completed SMP updates and amending Chapter 173-22 WAC to clarify designations of shorelands and wetlands associated with shorelines of the state. This rulemaking will be statewide. However, the specific requirement to address the impact of sea level rise and increased storm severity will apply only to jurisdictions with marine shorelines. For this rulemaking, Ecology will develop and follow a communication plan for public outreach, including a dedicated focus on connecting with people from overburdened communities and vulnerable populations. For the environmental justice assessment, we plan to connect through multiple methods, such as virtual meetings and listening sessions, which will take place in 2024 and 2025. There will also be additional opportunities for people to connect during the rulemaking public comment period and public hearings. To learn more about the rulemaking process and opportunities to get involved, visit our website, which will be updated with more information. You can also join our email list, which is also on our webpage.
07/19/2024 04/23/2024 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Amending the Apple Maggot Quarantine Boundary in chapter 16-470 WAC. As a result of a petition for rule making, the department is considering expanding the apple maggot quarantine area in Okanogan County. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
07/19/2024 04/17/2024 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Amending chapter 16-752 WAC, by adding species to the prohibited plants list. Adds additional species to the noxious weed seed and plant quarantine, which would prohibit their sale and distribution. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
04/16/2024 04/11/2024 04/25/2024 Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Accreditation of Cannabis Laboratories The WA State Department of Agriculture is proposing a new ruleset to establish a state program for the accreditation of cannabis laboratories in accordance with the standards set forth in 16-309 WAC. The purpose of the program is to ensure that laboratory standards described in chapter 16-309 WAC are followed when testing cannabis and cannabis products in Washington State. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment. An Environmental Justice Assessment of the Establishment of Chapter 16-310 WAC, Accreditation of Cannabis Laboratories
04/11/2024 04/11/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program 40101(d) Grid Resilience Grant Program The EPIC Unit in the Energy Division is developing a new grant program for electric grid resilience projects across the state. This will be a competitive solicitation using funding awarded to Washington State by the Department of Energy (DOE) from DOE's 40101(d) Grid Resilience State/Tribal Formula Grant Program. The program intends to strengthen grid resilience through funding projects that reduce the frequency, duration, and/or impact of power outages. The methods for which public comment can be provided for state agency consideration are still being determined. In a recent EJ Assessment, a written public comment period was opened, alongside a survey and a virtual feedback session. These options will be considered for this EJA.
04/11/2024 04/11/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Cap-and-Invest Linkage Rulemaking (Chapter 173-446 WAC and Chapter 173-441 WAC) As required by the Climate Commitment Act (CCA), Ecology is investigating the option of linking Washington’s Cap-and-Invest Program carbon market with the California-Québec carbon market. In a linked Cap-and-Invest Program, Washington’s carbon market would combine with the joint California-Québec market to create a single shared market with joint allowance auctions and a common allowance price across all jurisdictions. Allowances could be traded across jurisdictions and used to cover emissions in any of the three jurisdictions. As part of this effort, the Legislature passed legislation in 2024 modifying the CCA in ways that facilitate linkage (Engrossed Second Substitute Senate Bill 6058). This rulemaking is needed to modify Chapter 173-446 WAC and Chapter 173-441 WAC to implement these statutory changes as well as to make other changes to these rules necessary to facilitate linkage. These rule changes do not constitute linkage, nor do they require linkage or do anything that would make linkage inevitable. Additional steps would be needed, outside of the Washington rulemaking process, to establish linkage, including signing on to a linkage agreement. The Climate Commitment Act directs Ecology to consider linking Washington's Cap-and-Invest Program with other carbon markets. The law also requires Ecology to review specific criteria to ensure linkage would benefit Washington’s communities, economy, and climate goals. Ecology is initiating this environmental justice assessment and the rulemaking process and will provide engagement opportunities that include public meetings and comment periods. Ecology plans to conduct public engagement, with outreach focused on people from overburdened communities, vulnerable populations, and Tribes, for the purpose of developing the environmental justice assessment for this rule. Ecology is also available to meet with individual organizations and small groups at their request during the rulemaking process. As we schedule opportunities for feedback and participation, we will share them through our website and distribution list. Please visit the rulemaking’s webpage for updates. Please contact Nikki Harris, Climate Pollution Reduction Program Rulemaking Coordinator, at nikki.harris@ecy.wa.gov for comments or questions.
05/10/2024 04/10/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Distribution of the Community Reinvestment Account: Legal Assistance Provides outreach and education to support the vacating of criminal records and legal financial obligations relief and aims to address the needs of Black, Indigenous and Latino individuals impacted by the criminal justice system in disproportionately affected neighborhoods in Tacoma and Seattle. Advisory Groups Community Meetings (as guest), GovDelivery, Office Hours posted on the Department of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project website, Email through Dept of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project Website.
05/10/2024 04/10/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Distribution of the Community Reinvestment Account: Violence Prevention Provides capacity building and technical support to existing OFSVP funding programs addressing the prevention and intervention of firearm violence. Advisory Groups Community Meetings (as guest) GovDelivery, Office Hours posted on the Department of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project website, Email through Dept of Commerce Community Reinvestment Project Website.
04/09/2024 04/09/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Law Enforcement Vehicle Pursuit Technology Grant Program New program to provide law enforcement with grants for modern vehicle pursuit management technology (for example: GPS tracking equipment, automated license plate readers, aircraft, and non-armed and non-armored drones, etc.). Grants are for local law enforcement agencies (including tribal law enforcement agencies). Proposals must include a request for specific technology and a specific plan for implementation, use, and effectiveness reporting of that technology. Local law enforcement agencies seeking grants must: 1) Establish data-sharing and management policies; and (2) Establish policies ensuring all operating personnel are trained to use the requested technology and comply with the data-sharing and management policies mentioned in item 1 above. This program is expected to reduce the danger of pursuits in communities by giving law enforcement more efficient and modern tools. More technology being implemented may track additional data that may not have been historically tracked. Following a competitive process (RFP S24-34444-001) 18 contractors were selected for SFY '24. These are listed below: Omak Police Department Monroe Police Department Benton County Sheriff's Office Marysville Police Department Kirkland Police Department Woodland Police Department Everett Police Department Reardan Police Department Lake Forest Park Police Department Puyallup Police Department Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office Port Angeles Police Department in partnership with Lower Elwha Tribal Police Richland Police Department Washougal Police Department Olympia Police Department Yakima Police Department West Richland Police Department Spokane County Sheriff's Office In process: setting up a webpage, email engagement, and working with community engagement team internally.
07/19/2024 03/24/2024 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Amending the commercial feed and pet food/specialty pet food rules in chapters 16-250 and 16-252 WAC. Adopts the latest version of the Association of American Control Officials (AAFCO) Official Publication (OP), clarifying areas of the rule regarding livestock feed and including additional categories of product types that were previously absent. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
05/21/2024 03/22/2024 06/25/2024 Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules WSDA Grain Inspection Program’s Rulemaking for Chapter 16-240 WAC: Definitions, Standards, and Fees WSDA is proposing to amend Chapter 16-240 WAC by increasing some of the Grain Inspection Program fees, revising some of the fee structures to more accurately reflect the scope of services provided (including but not limited to adding fees for services that are not specifically identified) and to clarify language to ease in the understanding of the rule. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment. An Environmental Justice Assessment Of the Rulemaking for Chapter 16-240 WAC, WSDA Grain Inspection Program - Definitions, Stand
03/19/2024 03/19/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Chapter 173-905 WAC - Battery Stewardship Program The purpose of this rulemaking effort is to implement new program requirements established under chapter 70A.555 RCW Batteries—Environmental Stewardship, which was passed by the state legislature in April 2023. The new law creates an extended producer responsibility program for recycling most types of batteries. Beginning January 1, 2027, battery producers are required to pay into a program that establishes a statewide network of battery collection sites that will provide opportunities for people to drop off batteries at no cost. These collection sites are to be accessible and convenient to overburdened communities identified by the department. This program will increase opportunities for battery recycling throughout the state and will improve consistency of existing battery recycling programs in Washington. Ecology intends to provide battery stewardship organizations regulatory clarity so that the program is implemented equitably across Washington. Ecology will develop and follow a formal communication plan focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations in Washington. The department recognizes that all residents of Washington State, regardless of socio-economic factors, should have a say in the rules and regulations that affect them. Ecology will allow for all communities and individuals to provide valuable insights, feedback, and ideas regarding implementation of the law but will focus engagement efforts particularly on identified overburdened communities. Once Ecology has identified an overburdened community or vulnerable population, staff will connect with existing community groups wherever possible to utilize connections already established within that community. Staff also plan to use varied communications channels including virtual meetings, public hearings, and other targeted education and outreach to inform communities about the issues and impacts of the Battery Stewardship Program. Ecology will accept public comments during a formal comment period and multiple public hearings, the details of which will be shared on the rulemaking website and distributed to the email list for the rule in mid-2025.
03/19/2024 03/19/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Nonprofit and Religious Nonprofit Security Grant To provide grants to non-profit organizations including, but not limited to, religious nonprofits, "by and for" organizations, or cultural community centers, to fund the physical security or repair of such institutions. Advisory Groups, Email comments, Listening Sessions (as host), Social Media, Stakeholder Interviews and Surveys
03/05/2024 03/05/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of New grant or loan program Landfill Methane Emission Reduction Grant Owners and operators of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills in Washington must meet new requirements (RCW 70A.540) to reduce emission of methane gas, a potent greenhouse gas emitted by landfills. Under the new law, MSW owners and operators may be required to improve technology and performance of current systems in place, such as installing gas collection and control equipment or upgrading current equipment, increase monitoring requirements as well as record keeping and reporting. The 2023-25 Washington State Budget includes $15 million to establish a grant program and help offset the cost for landfill owners and operators to meet the new requirements. Landfills are a significant source of methane emissions in Washington. Ecology’s most recent Greenhouse Gas inventory reported approximately 1.5 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions from landfills, which was approximately 2% of the state’s total GHG emissions in 2018. Additionally, methane has underlying cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological implications. Communities adjacent to MSW landfills, especially those considered “overburdened,” may be concerned about the potential public health and additional downstream effects of uncontrolled methane emissions. While communities are not eligible entities, they Beginning in 2024, Ecology will conduct community engagement with overburdened communities on related air quality programs and funding opportunities. We are hoping to reduce redundancy for communities by trying to collaborate across teams for shared engagement activities for grants of similar kinds in the same program. Although specific events are yet to be planned, we are hoping to hear from communities through interviews, questionnaires, and community meetings to inform this grant program.
03/15/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Water Quality Program draft loan offer to the City of Lynden for updated infrastructure at the municipality’s wastewater treatment plant. The proposed action is to provide the City of Lynden with $18,394,140 of loan funding to improve the municipal wastewater treatment plant, including upgrading the oxidation ditches to a Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) biological treatment system, constructing a new blower building, and modifying a suite of other systems within the plant. These retrofits will improve nutrient removal to meet new water quality permit requirements and increase treatment capacity to accommodate anticipated economic growth in the area. The project location is the Lynden Wastewater Treatment Plant at 800 South 6th Street, Lynden, Washington. Anticipated benefits from this loan offer include: • Improved water quality in the Nooksack River and continued benefits to communities that use the Nooksack River, a tributary of Bellingham Bay, part of the Puget Sound. • Reduced nutrient pollution discharging from wastewater into the Nooksack River. • Increased treatment capacity for anticipated population growth over the next 20 years. • Greater energy efficiency in the wastewater systems. Ecology plans to conduct engagement, focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations, beginning in April 2024 to assess the environmental justice of this loan offer. Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding overburdened communities or populations with vulnerabilities and will seek further involvement as needed to address concerns. Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in Whatcom County and provide opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will invite Tribal consultation with impacted tribes, including but not limited to Nooksack, Lummi, Swinomish, Upper Skagit, and Tulalip Tribes. Ecology will engage in consultation in formats that are requested by the tribes and which create opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Please contact Faith Wimberley at faith.wimberley@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions.
03/29/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Loan offer to Snoqualmie Pass Utility District for wastewater treatment plant membrane bioreactor improvements The purpose of this action is to provide the Snoqualmie Pass Utility District with $18 million in loan funding to construct updates to the wastewater treatment infrastructure to meet surface water quality standards and phase out the current land treatment system. Infrastructure upgrades include a membrane bioreactor, solids handling facilities, aerobic digestion, sludge dewatering, drying beds, and associated instrumentation and controls. Currently, wastewater is land applied to 45 acres of Forest Service property. After completing these improvements, the Snoqualmie Pass Utility District will treat wastewater and discharge it to Coal Creek, which drains to Lake Keechelus. The project location includes the treatment plant at 370 Treatment Plant Road, Snoqualmie Pass, WA 98068. The project also impacts Coal Creek, a tributary of Lake Keechelus. Anticipated benefits from the investments made with this loan include: • The treated wastewater from the new membrane bioreactor system will have a higher water quality than the treated wastewater from the existing lagoon system. These improvements mean the facility will no longer release treated wastewater to land, which will prevent runoff to a nearby lake during part of the year. • The new treatment technology will discharge cleaner wastewater to Coal Creek. • The Forest Service will recover the land application site and allow it to return to natural habitat conditions. Ecology plans to conduct engagement focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations for the environmental justice assessment of this loan offer beginning in April 2024 . Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding environmental justice, overburdened communities, or vulnerable populations with vulnerabilities impacted by the action and seek further involvement to address concerns. Through methods yet to be determined, Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in Kittitas County and provide opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will also invite Tribal consultation with impacted Tribes, which includes but may not be limited to the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, Snoqualmie Indian Tribe, and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation. Please contact Faith Wimberley at faith.wimberley@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions, or visit the webpage below to stay informed.
03/15/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Water Quality Program draft loan offer to the City of Washougal for updated infrastructure at the city’s wastewater treatment plant. The purpose of this action is to provide the City of Washougal with $22,564,700 in loan funding to construct infrastructure updates at the municipality’s wastewater treatment plant including a new biological selector, new biosolids management facilities, and odor control facilities. These upgrades are needed to increase the facility’s capacity to process wastewater and address operational issues that have impeded the plant’s ability to meet permit requirements and respond to odor nuisances. The loan project is located at the City of Washougal Wastewater Treatment Plant, 3900 SE Lewis and Clark Hwy, Washougal, WA. Anticipated benefits from the improvements made with this loan include: • Meeting many permit provisions and regulatory requirements. • Implementing operations and maintenance best management practices outlined in engineering reports and permits to avoid future environmental and water quality impacts. • Replacing the existing lagoons with a mechanical thickening and dewatering process to achieve groundwater and wetland protections. • Future decommissioning of the existing lagoons to open several acres of publicly owned land for reuse. • Lowering biosolids treatment and disposal costs. • Resolving odor issues. • Increasing wastewater treatment capacity, allowing for continued growth in the City. Ecology plans to conduct engagement, focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations, for the purpose of the environmental justice assessment of this loan offer beginning in April 2024. Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding overburdened communities or populations with vulnerabilities and will seek further involvement as needed to address concerns. Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in Clark County and provide opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will also invite tribal consultation with impacted tribes which includes but may not be limited to the Yakama Nation and Cowlitz Indian Tribe. Ecology will engage in consultation in formats that are requested by the tribes and that create opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision.
03/29/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Loan offer to the City of Sequim for West Sequim Bay Corridor Sewer Extension and Lift Station Construction The purpose of this action is to provide the City of Sequim with $14,726,274 in standard loan and $1,273,726 in forgivable loan to expand the sewer service area into eastern Sequim, which eliminates eastern Sequim commercial and residential on-site septic systems. The project location includes several areas of the City of Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula. The city is located along the Dungeness River and Sequim Bay of the Salish Sea. • A sewer lift station located at Forrest Rd. • Approximately 5,100 feet of sewer pipe extending from a pump station along W Sequim Bay Rd. • Approximately 1,800 feet of gravity sewer main extending along W. Sequim Bay Rd. from Independence Dr. west to Washington Harbor Rd. • Approximately 5,100 feet of gravity sewer main extending along W. Sequim Bay Rd. from the west Pacific Northwest National Laboratory property line to Forrest Rd. • Right-of-way and pavement repair (from utility work) for W. Sequim Bay Rd. from Washington Harbor Rd. to Forrest Rd. Anticipated benefits from the project funded by this proposed loan include: This project transitions on-site septic systems to the utility’s sewer service area. This transition brings significant environmental and public health benefits . Residential households, developers, shellfish industry and consumers, and Tribes may experience these benefits. Failing on-site sewage systems (OSS) threaten Sequim’s drinking water supply, which primarily comes from groundwater. They also negatively affect Sequim Bay shellfish industry, treaty rights, recreational opportunities, harm marine life such as salmon and orcas, and can create public health hazards. Increasing access to sewer service supports anticipated residential and commercial development. • 50 – 75 current residential households • 375 – 533 undeveloped parcels • The John Wayne Marina with 300 boat slips, a restaurant, a banquet hall, and public restrooms. • The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory campus-expansion. Ecology plans to conduct engagement focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations for the environmental justice assessment of this loan offer beginning in April 2024. Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding overburdened communities or populations with vulnerabilities and will seek further involvement as needed to address concerns. Through methods yet to be determined, Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in Clallam County and provide opportunities for their involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will also invite Tribal consultation and conduct staff outreach with impacted Tribes, including, but not limited to, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. Please contact Faith Wimberley at faith.wimberley@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions.
03/29/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Loan offer to Hartstene Pointe Water-Sewer District for Hartstene Pointe Sewer Collection System Improvements. The proposed action is to provide the Hartstene Pointe Water-Sewer District with $14 million of loan funding for system-wide repairs and the replacement and relocation of a deteriorated sewer main. The project location is the Hartstene Pointe Water-Sewer District Sewer Collection System on Hartstene Island in Mason County, adjacent to Puget Sound via Case Inlet. Hartstene Island is in the Treaty-reserved Usual and Accustomed Area of the Squaxin Island Tribe. Anticipated benefits from the improvements made with this loan include: • Preventing a main sewer line failure on a bluff directly above a marine environment. Such a failure would result in raw sewage flows into Puget Sound and shoreline, which is a serious risk for public health, geoduck harvesting and shellfish farming, and water quality. • Preventing rainwater and water underground from flowing into the sewer pipes through leaks and pipe connections (infiltration and inflow). Excess inflow and infiltration can overload the wastewater system and violate the facility’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit. Permit violations result in fines to the local community, which can be burdensome. • This project will help restore Puget Sound because these changes directly improves the water quality (primarily to dissolved oxygen levels) of impaired portions of the Sound. Ecology plans to conduct engagements focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations beginning in April 2024 for the environmental justice assessment of this loan offer. Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding environmental justice, overburdened communities, or vulnerable populations with vulnerabilities impacted by the action and seek further involvement to address concerns. Through methods yet to be determined, Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in Mason County and provide opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will also invite Tribal consultation with impacted Tribes, including but not limited to the Squaxin Island, Nisqually Indian, and Skokomish Tribes. Please contact Faith Wimberley at faith.wimberley@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions, or visit the webpage below to stay informed.
03/29/2024 02/02/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Capital project, grant, or loan award of at least $12 million Loan offer to King County for the Duwamish Combined Sewer Overflow project The purpose of the proposed action is to provide King County with $70 million of loan funding to construct a storage facility and conveyance so that partially and untreated sewage mixed with rainwater (combined sewer overflow) can be routed for treatment before release into the Duwamish River through outfalls. The increased storage capacity will reduce the number of combined sewer overflows at two sites along the Duwamish River. Currently, based on a 20-year average, pollution overflows into the river 4.4 times per year at one site and 1.9 times per year at the other. The loan project locations are West Michigan Street Regulator Station (W Michigan St. RS) Overflow and Terminal 115 (T115) Overflow. These sites are part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund National Priorities List and the Washington Hazardous Sites List. Anticipated benefits from the investments made with this loan include: • The Lower Duwamish River will receive less pollution during severe rains because large volumes of sewage and rain runoff will be treated before discharge into the river. • Reducing the overflows to one per year at each site. Federal and state regulations require communities to reduce the frequency of untreated combined sewer overflows, on average, allowing no more than one overflow event per year. Reducing overflows benefits people, wildlife, and water quality because CSOs can carry contaminants such as pathogens, oxygen-consuming pollutants, solids, nutrients, and toxics. Ecology plans to conduct engagement focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations for the environmental justice assessment of this loan offer beginning in April 2024. Ecology conducted public engagement in February and March of 2024, with an online webinar and public comment period. We will respond to comments regarding overburdened communities or populations with vulnerabilities and will seek further involvement as needed to address concerns. Through methods yet to be determined, Ecology will identify additional opportunities to engage overburdened communities in King County and provide opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Ecology will also invite tribal consultation and staff discussions with impacted Tribes, which include but may not be limited to the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe, Puyallup Tribe, Snoqualmie Indian Tribe, Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, Suquamish Tribe, and Tulalip Tribes. Ecology will engage in consultation in formats that are requested by the Tribes and that create opportunities for their meaningful involvement in this funding decision. Please contact Faith Wimberley at faith.wimberley@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions.
02/01/2024 02/01/2024 Ongoing Health, Department of Agency-request legislation Potential Legislative Changes- Chapter 70.90 RCW The Washington State Department of Health (department) is conducting an Environmental Justice Assessment on potential agency legislative action for 2025. The department is considering a bill to amend chapter 70.90 RCW which regulates water recreation facilities. The proposed amendments would align state law with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) standards. The MAHC is based on the latest science and water recreation best practices. Proposed amendments to chapter 70.90 RCW will be posted on our webpage below and sent out via email to interested parties for their review. Comments on proposed amendments can be sent to waterrecreation@doh.wa.gov. Visit our website for more information on how to get involved.
01/30/2024 01/30/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program State Home Electrification and Appliance Rebates Program Commerce will provide grants to eligible third-party administrators to administer rebate programs for high-efficiency electric equipment and appliances, with a focus on rebate programs for low- and moderate-income households, small businesses, and adult family homes. The HEAR Program is providing grants in four tracks of funding: Local Government Programs, Tribal Electrification, Adult Family Homes, and LMI Residential Programs. A survey for households and small businesses is posted and open on the program website. Tribal listening sessions will be held in February - April 2024 time frame. When the Request for Applications is developed, Commerce will post the draft to the website for a public comment period.
01/25/2024 01/22/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program 23-25 Combined Renewable Energy Programming Energy Programs in Communities (EPIC) (Energy Division) will be running a combined, single application RFA for multiple programs in January 2024, five of which are brand new programs requiring an EJA: Hard to Decarbonize Sectors Grants, Clean Energy Siting and Permitting Grants, Large Scale Solar Innovation, Dual Use Solar Pilot Grants, Solar + Storage for Community Facilities, Community Solar + Storage for Low Income Grants. This combined EJA will focus on these provisos and their respective EJ concerns. A 30 day public comment period as well as a virtual public listening session for further comment.
01/18/2024 01/18/2024 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Chapters 173-400 and 173-401 WAC, General Regulations for Air Pollution Sources Chapter 173-400 WAC (General Regulations for Air Pollution Sources). This chapter establishes standards and rules to control and prevent pollution from air contaminant sources. The rulemaking will involve updating references to an Ecology technical manual used in source testing and certification. Chapter 173-401 WAC (Operating Permit Regulation). This chapter establishes Washington’s air operating permit program to comply with Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Rule amendments to this chapter are needed to remain in alignment with federal regulations and fix an incorrect reference. Ecology plans to conduct public engagement, with outreach focused on people from overburdened communities and vulnerable populations, for the purpose of developing the environmental justice assessment for this rule. We plan to hold informal stakeholder meetings during the rule development period where members of the public are invited to ask questions and provide comment. Meeting information will be provided via Ecology’s website and “Air Quality Rule and SIP Updates” email distribution list. We will hold also public hearing and comment period following rule proposal, which is expected in September 2024. Please contact Adam Saul at adam.saul@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions.
02/06/2024 01/08/2024 Ongoing Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program State Home Energy Assistance Program State appropriation provided solely for the department to administer grant funding through the existing network of federal low-income home energy assistance program grantees to provide low-income households with energy utility bill assistance. Under the grant program, each household accessing energy bill assistance must be offered an energy assessment that includes determining the household's need for clean cooling and heating system upgrades that improve safety and efficiency while meeting Washington's climate goals. Virtual meetings and post plan to website for review
01/12/2024 01/08/2024 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Aligning electric vehicle supply equipment rules with federal technical requirements Amends chapter 16-662 WAC, Weights and Measures, to align with the Federal Highway Administration's National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure program's technical requirements for electric vehicle supply equipment payment methods. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
02/06/2024 01/01/2024 07/19/2024 Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Japanese Beetle Quarantine Expansion Amends and expands the Japanese beetle quarantine to include additional portions of Yakima and Benton Counties, as well as a portion within the city Pasco. Soil samples will be added to the list of regulated articles, and a clarification will be made that cut flowers exposed to open air environments are a regulated article. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment. An Environmental Justice Assessment Of the 2024 Japanese Beetle Quarantine Expansion
02/08/2024 01/01/2024 Ongoing Puget Sound Partnership Other 2026-2030 Action Agenda for Puget Sound The Puget Sound Partnership is required to regularly develop and update an Action Agenda for Puget Sound. The Action Agenda outlines our region’s collective vision for a healthy and resilient Puget Sound and describes what we must achieve, how we will achieve it, and how we will hold ourselves accountable to ensure we make progress. The Action Agenda fulfills the Partnership's statutory mandate and purpose of the Clean Water Act's National Estuary Program (NEP), which guides millions of dollars of federal funding to the most beneficial projects and programs. The Action Agenda outlines strategies and actions that describe the work we must do to make progress toward our desired outcomes for Puget Sound recovery: Protect and restore habitat and habitat-forming processes; Protect and improve water quality; Protect the food web and imperiled species; Prevent the worst effects of climate change; and ensure human wellbeing. The Action Agenda provides opportunities for federal, tribal, state, local, and private partners to better invest resources and coordinate action. Partnership staff plan to engage overburdened communities and vulnerable populations around the content in the Action Agenda through direct, community-based communication and outreach. Feedback from these communities will be reviewed and considered as much as is practicable as the Partnership refines and updates the 2026-2030 Action Agenda. Recognizing some community members may not be familiar with the Action Agenda, Partnership staff will provide an overview of the Partnership and Action Agenda, outline clear expectations of how feedback will be used, and ask high-level and open-ended questions about Puget Sound recovery. Staff will provide various ways for community members to provide feedback, including surveys, interactive co-creation activities, one-on-one conversations at community events and neighborhood meetings, agency-hosted workshops and symposia, and meetings with our Community Advisory Council. The Partnership will assess language, cultural, and accessibility needs when engaging with community members. The Partnership will also report back to community members about how and why their feedback was or was not used.
01/22/2024 12/29/2023 Ongoing Commerce, Department of Significant legislative rules Updates to Growth Management Administrative Rules for Climate Change Planning Growth Management Services is updating Washington Administrative Codes to reflect recent legislation (HB 1181 - 2023 legislative session) regarding requirements for cities and counties to develop a climate change element within their comprehensive plans. A CR 101 has been submitted and was noticed January 19, 2024 to launch these efforts. Commerce conducts a monthly state agency advisory group and is forming city/county planner and other stakeholder input groups with special emphasis on overburdened communities and vulnerable populations. Commerce will host community 'listening sessions' to review drafts and also welcomes email comments and phone calls. Commerce communicates with stakeholders via GovDelivery emails, planner newsletters, conferences and tribal meetings.
01/19/2024 12/26/2023 06/03/2024 Commerce, Department of New grant or loan program Grant funding to protect and improve water quality and salmon recovery through smart growth planning Provide funding to local governments and tribes to revise their comprehensive plans and development regulations to better integrate stormwater and salmon recovery work in local jurisdiction's plans and programs. Email comments, GovDelivery emails, listening sessions Grants to local governments and tribes to incorporate salmon recovery into local planning efforts
03/07/2024 12/18/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Fallen Firefighters Memorial This Agency Request Legislation would direct the Department of Enterprise Services to establish a new memorial for fallen firefighters on the Capitol Campus. DNR will formally invite stakeholders to provide feedback on all the Agency Request Legislation for the upcoming legislative session. Comments will be received through an online portal and may be directed to individual DNR staff members, as well. Stakeholders are also encouraged to participate in the legislative process through public comment and engagement with elected representatives.
12/18/2023 12/18/2023 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Clean Fuels Program Rulemaking (Amendments to 173-424 WAC) Ecology is considering amendments to Chapter 173-424 WAC, Clean Fuels Program Rule. The rule aims to reduce the life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions per unit energy, or carbon intensity (CI), of transportation fuels used in Washington. This rulemaking is to align the Clean Fuel Standard (CFS) with Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5447 (ESSB 5447), which was signed into law on May 3, 2023. The law promotes the production and use of low-carbon alternative jet fuels, which are more commonly referred to as sustainable aviation fuels (SAF), in Washington. Ecology’s rulemaking will comply with ESSB 5447 by updating the date at which SAF pathway applications can be submitted for CFS credit generation. SAF reduces emissions from aviation, which has been identified as one of the most difficult transportation sectors to decarbonize. Lowering aviation emissions will also improve air quality and reduce health burdens on people living near airports and airport workers. Additionally, the rulemaking may consider the following changes to strengthen/streamline the CFS program: • Establishing requirements for a third-party verification program for fuel pathways and data reports submitted by program participants. • Establishing standards to encourage the production of low carbon intensity sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) production. • Amending/refining the compliance and enforcement process for the CFS program. • Updating the rule language to improve clarity and readability, align the rule with guidance documents, correct errors, and make miscellaneous improvements to program implementation. • Updating book-and-claim accounting requirements for electricity and biomethane. • Harmonizing the rule with Oregon and/or California low carbon or clean fuel program requirements. Ecology is not considering amending the other main components of the program, including annual carbon intensity standards, the Tier 2 WA-GREET model, and land use change factors. Ecology plans to conduct engagement, focused on connecting with overburdened communities and vulnerable populations, for the purpose of the environmental justice assessment of this rule. Engagement will begin in early 2024 and will include virtual public meetings, comment periods, and other targeted outreach, details of which will be shared on our rulemaking website and email distribution list. Please contact Adam Saul at adam.saul@ecy.wa.gov with any comments or questions.
03/07/2024 12/18/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Housing on Public Land This Agency Request Legislation adds a new section to RCW 82.29A to create a leasehold excise tax (LET) exemption for leases on public land used for the placement of newly constructed affordable housing. Currently, the LET fee is 12.84% of the lease rate. This exemption is intended to incentivize developers to build affordable housing on leased DNR land. The exemption applies to the land and the length of exemption depends on the following conditions: A 12-year LET exemption if the lessee commits to renting or selling at least 20% of units as affordable to low and moderate-income households; A 20-year LET exemption if the lessee commits to renting or selling at least 25% of units as affordable to low and moderate-income households. The purpose of this tax exemption is to provide housing for low-and-moderate income households, many of which include people from overburdened communities and vulnerable populations. Any formal contract for housing development would include agencies that represent these communities and support inclusion of their voices and lived experience in the creation of the housing units.
03/07/2024 12/18/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Drought Mitigation Revising RCW 79.13 to allow for DNR to lease assets as well as land and modernize publication/advertisement language. No plan has been made at this time.
03/07/2024 12/15/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Early Learning Facilities This Agency Request Legislation expands the definition of “Common School”, currently limited to K-12, to include early care and education. This allows for the construction and maintenance of early care and education facilities at public schools with revenue from DNR’s Common School Construction Fund. The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) will have the authority and discretion to allocate the proceeds received by the sale of timber or otherwise generated by state lands. A separate new capital gains tax now provides enough funding for K-12 school construction; this is proposed legislation is complementary and addresses an unfunded need. DNR will formally invite stakeholders to provide feedback on all the Agency Request Legislation for the upcoming legislative session. Comments will be received through an online portal and may be directed to individual DNR staff members, as well. Stakeholders are also encouraged to participate in the legislative process through public comment and engagement with elected representatives. OSPI will also convene a committee of early learning facilities experts to advise the prioritization methodology of applications for projects; members will include representatives from the Department of Children, Youth, and Families, Department of Commerce, one of the State’s educational Service Districts, the Washington State Housing Finance Commission, and the early learner facilities stakeholder group.
12/08/2023 12/08/2023 Ongoing Ecology, Department of Significant legislative rules Safer Products for Washington Cycle 1.5 Rulemaking The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) is starting a rulemaking to revise the Safer Products Restrictions and Reporting rule—Chapter 173-337 WAC—aiming to reduce PFAS in consumer products. Ecology plans to conduct this rulemaking to: • Reduce the use of priority chemicals in priority consumer products. • Revise Chapter 173-337 WAC in accordance with the regulatory actions outlined in the Regulatory Determinations Report to the Legislature that Ecology will submit by June 1, 2024. Under the authority of Chapter 70A.350 RCW, Ecology may restrict the manufacture, sale, and distribution of a chemical in a product, or require manufacturers to report the use of a chemical in a product. In this rulemaking, Ecology may create reporting requirements or restrictions that apply to the use of PFAS in product categories such as: • Apparel and gear. o Apparel examples include athleticwear, rainwear, school uniforms, clothing for everyday use, undergarments (reusable baby diapers and period underwear), hats, scarves, gloves, shoes, outerwear for mountaineering, outerwear for whitewater kayaking, and commercial fishing bibs for offshore fishing. o Gear examples include backpacks, sleeping bags, umbrellas, camping furniture, and climbing rope. • Cleaning products, including products to wash automobiles and boats. • Cookware and kitchen supplies. o Examples include frying pans, cooking pots, rice cookers, waffle makers, griddles, bakeware, and reusable baking liners. • Firefighting PPE (personal protective equipment). • Hard surface sealants. o Examples include sealants applied to hard porous surfaces like stone, unglazed tile, concrete, and wood. They can be used for interior and exterior applications. • Waxes and polishes, including products for floors, automobiles, skis, and snowboards. PFAS are a group of toxic chemicals that are very persistent in the environment. Most people living in the United States have PFAS in their blood. People are exposed through food, drinking water, and products with PFAS. As products are created, used, and disposed, exposure can occur: • Directly from items such as apparel, cleaning products, and cookware. • Indirectly from the environment—through the air we breathe, water we drink, and food we eat. Ecology plans to develop rules that could: • Reduce the use of PFAS in products by restricting PFAS when Ecology identifies safer, feasible, and available alternatives. This will help: o Reduce consumers’ and workers’ exposure to PFAS. o Reduce the amount of PFAS entering the environment. • Increase product ingredient transparency. Get involved in this rulemaking by: • Sharing feedback on the Cycle 1.5 Draft Regulatory Determinations Report. The comment period is open now and closes at 11:59 p.m. PST on January 12, 2024. • Signing up for email announcements. • Attending webinars. Our next webinars will occur on December 13 and 14, 2023. See our interested parties webpage for more information. • Contacting Stacey Callaway at stacey.callaway@ecy.wa.gov or 360-584-5661. As we schedule additional opportunities to provide feedback and participate in workshops, we will share details on our webpages and via our email list. We anticipate: • Developing draft rule requirements in the summer of 2024. • Sharing a preliminary draft rule, providing a public comment period, and hosting webinars in the fall of 2024. • Proposing a formal draft rule, providing a public comment period, and hosting hearings, in the summer of 2025. • Adopting the revised rule by December 1, 2025.
03/07/2024 12/08/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Commercial Use Fees Agency Request Legislation to amend RCW 4.24.210, the Recreational Immunity Statute, to give DNR the authority to charge fees for recreation permits, issued for organized recreation or educational activities. If successful, this statutory authority will provide DNR the ability to develop a fee structure for recreation permits, which will allow the program to pursue administrative cost recovery and will provide the certainty needed for the future development of an agency Commercial Recreation Policy. DNR will formally invite stakeholders to provide feedback on all the Agency Request Legislation for the upcoming legislative session. Comments will be received through an online portal and may be directed to individual DNR staff members, as well. Stakeholders are also encouraged to participate in the legislative process through public comment and engagement with elected representatives. If we are successful in getting this agency request legislation passed, we will complete a thorough outreach process with community members as we develop a fee structure and commercial recreation policy. We will look to our internal Environmental Justice Office for guidance on this work.
03/07/2024 12/08/2023 Ongoing Natural Resources, Department of Agency-request legislation Smokey Bear License Plate This Agency Request Legislation would establish a Smokey Bear license plate that would be available for purchase in October 2024. Revenue from Smokey Bear License plates would be devoted to wildfire prevention programs administered by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). This would be the agency’s first license plate, the state’s only license plate for wildfire prevention, and is the symbol of support for wildland fire fighters. DNR will formally invite stakeholders to provide feedback on all the Agency Request Legislation for the upcoming legislative session. Comments will be received through an online portal and may be directed to individual DNR staff members, as well. Stakeholders are also encouraged to participate in the legislative process through public comment and engagement with elected representatives.
12/05/2023 12/05/2023 Ongoing Commerce, Department of Agency-request legislation Changing the incentive structure for tier 1 buildings This proposed Agency Request Legislation would change the authorizing language for the Clean Buildings Early Adopter Incentive Program. This incentive program, authorized in 2019, offers $75M in incentives to Tier 1 buildings owners who bring their buildings into compliance. This ARL would remove the 85 cent cap per square foot and allow Commerce to have more flexibility in establishing an appropriate incentive. This would allow Commerce to offer an incentive greater than 85 cents per square foot and offer enhanced incentives for buildings which meet a number of important criteria (ex. The building meets an equity criteria). This represents a small change in the authorizing language for the program, which has now been active for four years. Public comment will be accepted at buildings@commerce.wa.gov
01/10/2024 12/04/2023 Ongoing Agriculture, Department of Significant legislative rules Aligning general pesticide rules with federal certification and training standards Amends chapter 16-228 WAC, General Pesticide Rules, to align with SB 5330 (Chapter 186, Laws of 2023), the federal certification and training standards in 40 CFR 171 passed in 2017, and the Washington Plan for Certification of Pesticide Applicators approved by the Environmental Protection Agency in December 2022. Members of the public can direct their comments on this significant agency action to envjustice@agr.wa.gov. Community engagement, particularly for any communities identified as overburdened for this significant agency action, will also occur as part of the development of the environmental justice assessment.
03/18/2024 12/01/2023 Ongoing Health, Department of Agency-request legislation Cottage Food Operations Agency Request Legislation The Department wants to add Cottage Food Operations into the public health system. This will help us direct our food safety and community engagement efforts with those who want to sell food prepared in home kitchens. food.safety@doh.wa.gov

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