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Department of Corrections

MCC: WSR Perimeter Wall Renovation

30000117

The Monroe Correctional Complex - Washington State Reformatory security wall, constructed between 1908 and 1911, serves as the secure perimeter for WSR and the Intensive Management Unit. Its attached catwalk provides the only means of reaching multiple security guard towers. The wall was damaged in an earthquake in 1997 and is not earthquake resistant. The catwalk and hand rails have failing supports, posing potential safety risks to correctional staff who utilize it daily. Design funding to replace or repair the perimeter wall is provided. A reappropriation of funds is also granted to complete the predesign funded in the 2020 supplemental.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 100,000 100,000 1,000,000 10,063,000 11,263,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 11,263,000

WCC: Paint & Repair 300,000 Gallon Water Storage Tank

30000697

One of the water towers at the Washington Corrections Center in Shelton was constructed in 1964 and is coated with lead-based paint. The paint protects the metal structure from the elements and prevents rusting. The paint is in poor condition and the tower has extensive rusting. This water tower supplies approximately one-third of the facility’s domestic water supply and water needed for fire suppression. The remaining water tank does not have the capacity to provide an adequate water supply to the facility. This project will repair and repaint the water tower to preserve its structural integrity and extend its service life by 15-20 years.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 2,967,000 0 2,967,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 2,967,000

MCC: TRU Roof Programs and Recreation Building

30000738

The roof and roof-mounted equipment on the south side of the Twin Rivers Unit at the Monroe Correctional Complex is in failing condition and has significant leaks that create safety hazards when it rains, and is causing damage to electronic systems, ceilings and walls. This portion of the building contains the Education, Library and Central Stores program. The Central Stores program provides food, hygiene and other products to incarcerated individuals at correctional facilities statewide. This project funds predesign, design, and construction to replace the roof and any failing roof-top equipment such as, but not limited to fans or vents. The replacement of the main heating, ventilation and air conditioning system for this building is being requested as part of project MCC: TRU Support Building HVAC Replacement 40000379.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 5,996,000 0 5,996,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 5,996,000

SW IMU Recreation Yard Improvement

30001123

The secure yards in the Intensive Management Units at the Department of Corrections are currently enclosed with concrete walls on three or four sides, and a concrete ceiling, or a fenced ceiling respectively. Other states have lost lawsuits related to the small size and lack of openness of their secure yards. Funding is provided to design and construct larger, more open secure yards at IMUs throughout the state. The priority facility for the 2021-23 funding is the Washington State Penitentiary IMU South. A reappropriation of funds is also granted to continue to remodel the recreation yards from the 2017-19 biennium.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
521,000 129,000 850,000 1,500,000 1,532,000 4,532,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 4,532,000

ECWR: Foundation and Siding

40000067

Despite monitoring and mitigation repairs performed over the past decade, the foundation of the Eleanor Chase Work Release in Spokane has settled to the point that the building envelope, concrete stairs at the building entrance and surrounding sidewalks are compromised. The siding is also cracked as a result of the foundation settlement and widening. This project provides design funding to replace the building envelope, including siding and windows, install new downspouts, gutters, foundation and site drainage, and repair or replace sidewalks and stairs that lead to the building entrance as needed.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 600,000 4,399,000 4,999,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 4,999,000

WSP: SC BAR Unit Security and Safety Barriers

40000091

There have been incidents of incarcerated individuals threatening to harm themselves or others by jumping or pushing themselves over the hand rails on the second and third mezzanine levels of the Baker, Adams, and Rainier Units at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla. In some instances, incarcerated individuals have climbed over the hand rails. This project will install no-climb safety barriers around the perimeter of the second and third mezzanine levels and on the stairs of the BAR Units.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 3,000,000 0 3,000,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 3,000,000

SW: Electric Car Chargers

40000178

The DOC has inadequate charging capability for fleet vehicles at some prison locations, has no charging capability at other prison locations and all work release locations and no publicly accessible charging stations for use by staff or visitors. This project will fund scoping, design, and partial construction of direct current fast charging stations and level two networked charging stations at all DOC prison and work release facilities. The priority will be to provide charging stations for the perimeter patrol vehicles at the 12 prisons around the state. This project aligns with the Governor’s greenhouse gas reduction and EV adoption goals as stated in Executive Order 18-01.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 2,000,000 6,000,000 8,000,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 8,000,000

MCC: WSR Clinic Roof Replacement

40000180

The roof for the health services building at the Monroe Correctional Complex - Washington State Reformatory has numerous cracks and separations that allow water to infiltrate and saturate the insulation, which has trapped standing water inside and started to potentially compromise the structure of the building. The roof is past its life expectancy as is the heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment for the building, which is mounted on the roof and leaks refrigerant at a rate that exceeds Environmental Protection Agency regulations. Funds are provided for construction to replace the roof and HVAC equipment for the building. A reappropriation of funds is also granted to complete predesign and design phases of the project.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 125,000 700,000 8,508,000 0 9,333,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 9,333,000

MCC: SOU and TRU - Domestic Water and HVAC Piping System

40000246

The galvanized iron piping systems at the Monroe Correctional Complex – Twin Rivers Unit and Special Offenders Unit are developing leaks caused by corrosion. The leaks are causing water infiltration in the walls, which may potentially contribute to mold contamination. Also, corrosion in the water lines is causing problems with the heating and cooling systems and may potentially elevate the levels of heavy metals in the water system. Funding is provided for design and initial construction to replace the domestic water piping and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) water piping and to repair the wiring and ductwork for the HVAC systems at TRU and SOU. A reappropriation of funds is also granted to complete the predesign.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 100,000 300,000 2,729,000 18,922,000 22,051,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 22,051,000

Minor Works - Preservation Projects

40000254

Minor works preservation funding is provided to reduce risks to people and property and maximize the function and utility of state assets.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 22,675,000 60,833,000 83,508,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 83,508,000

LCC: Boiler Replacement

40000255

The Larch Corrections Center utilizes a central energy plant to provide heating and hot water for most of the buildings at the facility, serving both heating and domestic hot water requirements. The central boiler plant consists of one main boiler and two backup boilers. The two backup boilers have failed and are being addressed through a minor works project due to urgency of bringing the boilers back in operation. This project will replace the main boiler with a new environmentally sustainable biomass hot water boiler system, which will provide a dependable source of domestic hot water and a stable heating system.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 1,300,000 3,695,000 4,995,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 4,995,000

MCC: TRU Support Building HVAC Replacement

40000379

The existing heating ventilation and air conditioning system at the TRU Support building uses rooftop equipment, which is beyond its useful life and failing. The system does not provide adequate ventilation and its controls are unreliable in terms of complying with code requirements that require the units to either shut down or go into an exhaust mode in the event of a fire to provide smoke control. This project provides funding to design and construct a new HVAC system, including replacement of the outdoor air handling units, related equipment and controls. It will also re-balance and commission the system, so it will operate much more efficiently and save energy.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 4,646,000 0 4,646,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 4,646,000

WCC: Support Buildings Roof Replacement

40000380

1. Identify the problem or opportunity addressed. Why is the request a priority? The roofing systems have failed and need to be replaced to preserve the buildings integrity, protect the assets housed in the buildings, and provide an adequate and safe work space for staff. All of these roofs have exceeded the life expectancy that was identified in the 1998 Roof Survey that was completed by Kumata and Associates more than 10 years (see attachment). · The R-unit Gym: Visual inspection of this 15,210 sq. ft. metal roof and the metal siding shows significant water penetration, and sections of the internal gutter system that are visible show significant corrosion. The roof, gutter system and at least some of the metal side sheeting needs to be replaced. Water is leaking into the gym in several places. This roofing system needs to be repaired in order to protect and preserve the building. · M-Building (Warehouse/Motor Pool): Visual inspection of the underside of this building’s 45,000 sq. ft. roof shows severe cracking and rust colored stains. This is the same issue experienced with G-Building in the early 2000’s. Testing was conducted on G-Building at that time that showed the rust colored stains were caused by roof leaks that were penetrating the concrete roof and deteriorating the structural rebar. Following the testing, the G-Building roof was replaced. This same condition is observed in M-Building and the roofing system needs to be replaced to preserve the structural integrity of the concrete roof. · Heavy Equipment Building: Visual inspection of the underside of this buildings 9,580 sq. ft. roof shows that a significant amount of the plywood sheeting has suffered water damage caused by extensive roof leaks. The roof condition is so poor that staff are not allowed to access this roof because of the risk of collapse. · Professional Learning and Performance Center #2: this 3,400 sq. ft. roof needs to be replaced as identified in the attached report from MC Squared to correct for significant ponding that is occurring on the roof due to creep of the concrete supporting beams. The report needs to be thoroughly read to understand the significance of this issue/concerns from the creep. But basically the more it creeps, the more water ponds and this subjects the beams to more load which accelerates the creep until eventually the load is greater than the beams will support and they fail. This is one of two training buildings that routinely have upwards of 35 staff attending training in this building. Hence the concern and need to replace this roof. · Steam Plant: this 5,558 sq. ft. roof has failed and is leaking in several places. This a single ply membrane roof and the scrim is showing. When it reaches this condition the material is no longer an effective water barrier. The seams are delaminating allowing water to penetrate underneath the membrane, and significant ponding is occurring which exacerbates the failure of the roofing material. The leaks are over the steam plant boilers which are critical to provide heat and hot water for the facility. This roof needs to be replaced to protect the integrity or the concrete roof and ensure that Steam Plant mechanical and electrical systems are not damaged due to water intrusion. If we do not invest the money now to maintain these roofs, it will result in much more costly repairs later. Further neglect will result in additional degradation and will require a major repair project(s) or construction of new facilities. 2. What will the request produce or construct? When will the project start and be completed? Identify whether the project can be phased, and if so, which phase is included in the request. This project replaces 128,968 square feet of failed roofing and roof top equipment on the five buildings identified above in the “Agency Summary” with new roofing systems and equipment. The project will also repair the water damaged facility and corroded structural components, as well as the flashing, gutters, downspouts and any damaged structural components, such as sheeting. This project will begin in July 2021 (FY2022), and will be completed in June 2025 (FY2025). The DOC will be requesting funding for the pre-design, design and phase one of construction in the 2021-23 (FY2022-23) biennium. The DOC will be requesting funding for phase two of construction in the 2023-25 (FY2024-25) biennium. 3. How would the request address the problem or opportunity identified in question #1? What would be the result of not taking action? This project replaces the leaking roof systems and the 1964 roof-top equipment. It will also correct structural problems associated with water intrusion. The improvements that this project will provide will also enable continued use of these five buildings, which are all critical to the daily operations of WCC. 4. What alternatives were explored? Why was the recommended alternative chosen? If this project has an associated predesign, please summarize the alternatives the predesign considered. 1. Do nothing. This option was rejected as the roof systems and roof top equipment have failed. Previous delays of this project have resulted in increasing the scope of work to include repairing water damage and structural components of the facility. Continued delays will eventually drive the requirement for construction of replacement facilities, and/or moving operations to contracted facilities to meet the requirements. 2. Repair the roofs and equipment. This option was rejected because repairing the roofing material and equipment is no longer a feasible option. The facility maintenance team did a great job extending the life of these assets as long as possible, but this is no longer a viable option. Roof patches will no longer hold and many of the parts needed for the equipment are no longer available. 3. Replace the roofs and equipment. This option was chosen and it enables the state to keep the facility operational and mitigates the risks of constructing new replacement building, overcrowding, and/or use of contract facilities at higher costs. 5. Which clientele would be impacted by the budget request? Where and how many units would be added, people or communities served, etc. New roofs will protect the building, equipment, and occupants from damage caused by leaks, collapse, or failure. The project benefits 583 staff and 1,600 incarcerated individuals at WCC by creating a safe and healthy environment. This project enables the continued use of the buildings which ultimately benefits the state of Washington by mitigating the requirement to replace these facilities at a much higher cost for new construction. Additionally, the new roof system and roof top equipment will be significantly more energy efficient than the existing systems. Funding this project provides multiple economic benefits. It reduces long term cost by protecting expensive building equipment, eliminating costly emergency repairs, and reduces liability to the state by protecting the safety of staff and offenders. This project also provides contractor jobs through both design and construction services. 6. Will other funding be used to complete the project? How much, what fund source, and could the request result in matching federal, state, local, or private funds? State Construction funds (057) will be requested for the pre-design, design and phase one of the construction of this project in 2021-23 (FY2022-23). State Construction funds (057) will be requested for the phase two of the construction of this project in 2023-25 (FY2204-25). 7. Describe how this project supports the agency’s strategic master plan or would improve agency performance. Reference feasibility studies, master plans, space programming, and other analyses as appropriate. The mission of DOC is to improve public safety by positively changing lives. DOC’s vision is working together for safer communities. This Capital request aligns with the one or more of the following Results Washington Goals and Outcome Measures: · World Class Education · Prosperous Economy · Sustainable Energy and Clean Environment · Healthy and Safe Communities · Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government This request supports the following goals, objectives, approaches/strategies and outcome measures in DOC’s 2019-23 Strategic Plan: · Improve Lives – Reduce Recidivism and Improved Continuity of Health Care · Keep People Safe – Decrease Prison Violence and Improved Reporting and Engagement · Engage and Respect Employees – Focus on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Respect (EDIR) · Achieve Organizational Excellence - Manage Capacity and Establish Integrated Outcome Based Management This capital project will ensure that DOC facilities are well maintained, safe and secure for incarcerated individuals and staff, and efficient to operate. The DOC is currently working on developing an Energy Master Plan, because every maintenance, equipment, renewal, or replacement decision has a long term impact on the agency. These decisions can affect and limit DOC’s ability to reach the goal of becoming a net zero agency. During the pre-design and schematic design phase of this project the Energy Master Plan will be considered. Alternative HVAC systems will be evaluated in order to determine the best solution to move DOC closer to reaching the goal of being a net zero agency. 8. For IT-related costs: Does this project fund the development or acquisition of a new or enhanced software or hardware system or service? Does this decision package fund the acquisition or enhancements of any agency data centers? (See OCIO Policy 184 for definition.) Does this decision package fund the continuation of a project that is, or will be, under OCIO oversight? (See OCIO Policy 121.) There are no IT impacts anticipated as a result of this project. 9. If the project is linked to the Puget Sound Action Agenda, describe the impacts on the Action Agenda, including expenditure and FTE detail. See Chapter 13 (Puget Sound Recovery) in the 2019-21 Operating Budget Instructions. This project is not linked to the Puget Sound Action Agenda. 10. Does this project contribute to statewide goals to reduce carbon pollution and/or improve energy efficiency? If yes, please elaborate. Yes. 11. Is there additional information you would like decision makers to know when evaluating this request? There is a great deal of risk associated with the delay of this project. There are many parts of the existing system that could fail. It is important to correct this problem now or design a solution that will address the concerns as soon as possible. If this project goes unfunded the ongoing maintenance and emergency project costs will continue to increase. There are no ongoing operating cost impacts related to this capital project that will need to be funded. One of DOC’s Strategic Anchors is the commitment to operate a safe and humane corrections system and partner with others to transform lives for a better Washington. Corrections believes in creating an environment that values physical, mental, and emotional security and well-being. We honor those who advance safety for all.

Prior Biennium Current Biennium Reappropriations Appropriations Future Cost Total Costs
0 0 0 7,000,000 9,427,000 16,427,000
Funds: State Building Construction Account - State 16,427,000