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Home » Budget » Agency Activities » Sustainable Energy and a Clean Environment

Sustainable Energy and a Clean Environment

Last Updated: 10/13/2021

Preserve, maintain and restore natural systems and landscapes

Strategy: Preserve, maintain and restore natural systems and landscapes

Agency: 477 - Department of Fish and Wildlife

A046 - Preserve and Restore Aquatic Habitats and Species

Perpetuating and managing wildlife, fish and shellfish into the future requires healthy aquatic habitat. Washington’s imperiled salmon and orca populations need healthy habitat to ensure ecosystem support throughout their life. The key reasons the state has seen a decline in wild salmon populations and subsequent orca health is due to habitat quality that has degraded over time. The department strives to preserve aquatic habitat health by protecting habitat from the effects of construction projects through the Hydraulic Project Approval (HPA) work, consulting with businesses, landowners and governments regarding aquatic species impacts, reducing the risk and devastation of oil spills, ensuring enough water remains in waterways to support healthy fish lifecycles, and monitoring and controlling invasive species. The department seeks to restore degraded habitat by improving fish passage through removal of stream barriers and screening of water diversions, developing and implementing plans to recover imperiled species and seeking out grant funding to use towards completing various restoration projects. Furthermore, effectively addressing the dual challenge posed by the changing climate and a rapidly growing human population is fundamental to WDFW’s success in the 21st century in all of these areas. To ensure this success, the department studies and plans for climate impacts on aquatic lands and resulting effects on species. In order to successfully preserve and restore aquatic habitats, the department maintains enforcement presence throughout the state to ensure construction projects near waterways are compliant with HPA permits, inspect vessels for invasive species, perform orca patrols and enforce all statewide rules and regulations that protect aquatic habitats and species.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 264.7 270.4 267.6
001 - General Fund
State 26,870,000 28,734,000 55,604,000
Federal 5,499,000 6,102,000 11,601,000
Local 1,508,000 1,496,000 3,004,000
001 - General Fund Totals 33,877,000 36,332,000 70,209,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 436,000 458,000 894,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 4,000 15,000 19,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 573,000 744,000 1,317,000
108 - Motor Vehicle Account
State 200,000 200,000 400,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
Local 6,000 6,000 12,000
14G - Ballast Water & Biofouling Mgt Acct
State 5,000 5,000 10,000
16H - Col Riv Salmon/Steelhead Endrsmnt
Non-Appropriated (6,000) (6,000) (12,000)
200 - Reg Fish Enhance Salmonid Recovery
Federal 2,377,000 2,624,000 5,001,000
209 - Regional Fisheries Enhance Group
Non-Appropriated 1,229,000 1,042,000 2,271,000
217 - Oil Spill Prevention Account
State 484,000 563,000 1,047,000
21S - Aquatic Invasive Species Mngmt Acct
State 22,000 24,000 46,000
23P - Model Toxics Control Operating Acct
State 1,506,000 1,467,000 2,973,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 2,114,000 2,135,000 4,249,000
444 - Fish & Wildlife Equipment Revolving
Non-Appropriated 117,000 117,000 234,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 264.7 270.4 267.6
GFS 26,870,000.0 28,734,000.0 55,604,000.0
Other 16,074,000.0 16,992,000.0 33,066,000.0
Totals 42,944,000.0 45,726,000.0 88,670,000.0
Expected Results

Aquatic habitats will contribute to a robust ecosystem that supports fish and wildlife in Washington. These healthy habitats will contribute to strong species diversity and abundant opportunities for hunting, fishing and non-consumptive outdoor recreation. Those hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation opportunities will contribute to economic health in rural communities reliant on outdoor recreation. Local and state governments will use the agency’s scientific knowledge in their land use and permitting decisions leading to sustained critical habitats.

A047 - Preserve and Restore Terrestrial Habitats and Species

Perpetuating and managing wildlife, fish and shellfish into the future requires healthy terrestrial habitat. The department strives to preserve terrestrial habitat health by consulting with businesses, landowners and governments regarding terrestrial species and habitat impacts and legalities, partnering with private landowners to implement conservation strategies, permitting and regulating wildlife-related businesses such as taxidermy and rehabilitation centers, and responding to and mitigating wolf conflicts. The department seeks to restore degraded terrestrial habitat and imperiled species by developing and implementing plans to recover and sustain diverse wildlife and seeking out grant funding to use towards completing various habitat restoration projects. Furthermore, effectively addressing the dual challenge posed by the changing climate and a rapidly growing human population is fundamental to WDFW’s success in the 21st century in all of these areas. To ensure this success, the department studies and plans for climate impacts on lands and resulting effects on species. In order to successfully preserve and restore terrestrial habitats, the department maintains enforcement presence throughout the state to respond to incidents such as wolf depredations, ensure compliance of wildlife related businesses such as taxidermists and rehabilitation centers and enforce all statewide rules and regulations that protect terrestrial habitats and species.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 54.1 55.9 55.0
001 - General Fund
State 5,665,000 6,340,000 12,005,000
Federal 3,829,000 4,249,000 8,078,000
Local 307,000 304,000 611,000
001 - General Fund Totals 9,801,000 10,893,000 20,694,000
01B - ORV & Nonhighway Account
State 1,000 1,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 19,000 20,000 39,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 9,000 9,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 2,000 2,000 4,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 1,954,000 3,169,000 5,123,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
Local 61,000 62,000 123,000
14A - Wildlife Rehabilitation Account
State 311,000 310,000 621,000
19W - Wolf-Livestock Conflict Account
Non-Appropriated 2,000 2,000 4,000
217 - Oil Spill Prevention Account
State 1,000 4,000 5,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 1,672,000 1,689,000 3,361,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 54.1 55.9 55.0
GFS 5,665,000.0 6,340,000.0 12,005,000.0
Other 8,168,000.0 9,811,000.0 17,979,000.0
Totals 13,833,000.0 16,151,000.0 29,984,000.0
Expected Results

Terrestrial habitats will contribute to a robust ecosystem that supports healthy wildlife in Washington. These healthy habitats will contribute to strong species diversity and abundant opportunities for hunting, fishing and non-consumptive outdoor recreation. Those hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation opportunities will contribute to economic health in rural communities reliant on outdoor recreation. With their benefit in mind, local and state governments will use the agency’s scientific knowledge in their land use and permitting decisions leading to sustained critical habitats.

A048 - Acquire and Manage Lands

WDFW owns and manages over one million acres of land throughout Washington. These lands provide habitat for fish and wildlife, as well as recreational opportunities for the public, such as hunting, fishing and wildlife viewing. WDFW’s land base is strategically developed based on the conservation needs of fish and wildlife, and provides sustainable fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and other recreational opportunities when compatible with healthy and diverse fish and wildlife populations and their habitats. To effectively and responsibly own and manage public lands, the department maintains and improves the ecological health of its lands, strategically acquires new lands or sells lands that no longer serve the mission, builds and maintains safe, sanitary and ecologically friendly water access sites and ensures public safety through enforcement presence.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 129.6 130.4 130.0
001 - General Fund
State 2,888,000 4,448,000 7,336,000
Federal 8,166,000 8,047,000 16,213,000
Local 754,000 748,000 1,502,000
001 - General Fund Totals 11,808,000 13,243,000 25,051,000
01B - ORV & Nonhighway Account
State 309,000 306,000 615,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 287,000 302,000 589,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 15,000 15,000 30,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 5,000 5,000 10,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 394,000 287,000 681,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
State 1,466,000 1,435,000 2,901,000
Federal 259,000 259,000 518,000
Local 1,439,000 1,663,000 3,102,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account Totals 3,164,000 3,357,000 6,521,000
14A - Wildlife Rehabilitation Account
State 1,000 1,000 2,000
19W - Wolf-Livestock Conflict Account
Non-Appropriated 7,000 7,000 14,000
22N - Fish and Wildlife Fed Lnds Rev Acct
Non-Appropriated 50,000 50,000 100,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 4,833,000 4,882,000 9,715,000
444 - Fish & Wildlife Equipment Revolving
Non-Appropriated 116,000 117,000 233,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 129.6 130.4 130.0
GFS 2,888,000.0 4,448,000.0 7,336,000.0
Other 18,101,000.0 18,124,000.0 36,225,000.0
Totals 20,989,000.0 22,572,000.0 43,561,000.0
Expected Results

Land management will result in the conservation and restoration of diversity of Washington’s fish and wildlife species and their habitats, while providing affordable access to hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching opportunities. Department land and sites will be managed appropriately to balance hunting, fishing and wildlife viewing with ecosystem preservation. Land management will successfully preserve or enhance its habitat value, minimize the spread of invasive species, and support the conservation of biodiversity and the recovery of threatened and endangered species.

A049 - Manage Fishing Opportunities

WDFW is responsible for the management of Washington commercial and recreational fisheries. Management of these fisheries includes maintaining compliance with complex intersections of tribal treaties, international agreements, case law, federal Endangered Species Act restrictions and monitoring of species health and populations. To manage fisheries, the department monitors and manages populations of both shellfish and fin fish; develops, negotiates and implements fisheries co-management plans; markets and sells fishing licenses; and manages licenses for commercial fishing groups. In order to effectively manage fisheries, the department maintains enforcement presence in commercial marine areas as well as recreational fishing locations for trout and anadromous fish, such as salmon.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 295.1 299.9 297.5
001 - General Fund
State 10,317,000 9,617,000 19,934,000
Federal 10,769,000 11,950,000 22,719,000
Local 8,264,000 8,199,000 16,463,000
001 - General Fund Totals 29,350,000 29,766,000 59,116,000
01B - ORV & Nonhighway Account
State 5,000 4,000 9,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 2,459,000 2,931,000 5,390,000
04M - Recreational Fisheries Enhancement
State 256,000 258,000 514,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 99,000 98,000 197,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 8,000 8,000 16,000
09J - WA Coast Crab Pot Buoy Tag Account
Non-Appropriated 60,000 60,000 120,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 3,821,000 5,112,000 8,933,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
Local 48,000 48,000 96,000
12G - Rockfish Research Account
Non-Appropriated 227,000 223,000 450,000
14A - Wildlife Rehabilitation Account
State 2,000 2,000 4,000
19W - Wolf-Livestock Conflict Account
Non-Appropriated 5,000 5,000 10,000
217 - Oil Spill Prevention Account
State 9,000 11,000 20,000
21S - Aquatic Invasive Species Mngmt Acct
State 58,000 94,000 152,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 8,885,000 8,975,000 17,860,000
259 - Coastal Crab Account
Non-Appropriated 39,000 38,000 77,000
320 - Puget Sound Crab Pot Buoy Tag Acct
Non-Appropriated 20,000 17,000 37,000
507 - Oyster Reserve Land Account
State 314,000 86,000 400,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 295.1 299.9 297.5
GFS 10,317,000.0 9,617,000.0 19,934,000.0
Other 35,348,000.0 38,119,000.0 73,467,000.0
Totals 45,665,000.0 47,736,000.0 93,401,000.0
Expected Results

Fishing season decisions support healthy fish populations and ensure that commercial and recreational fishing harvest levels are sustainable. Fishing opportunities contribute towards economic activity, while complying with federal endangered species and other environmental requirements. WDFW and tribes work cooperatively to effectively manage fish populations. WDFW honors tribal treaty rights that were signed by the federal government in 1854-55 and upheld by United States v. Washington, 384 F. Supp. 312 (W.D. Wash. 1974).

A050 - Produce Hatchery Fish

WDFW maintains 81 hatcheries, either through direct ownership or management contracted with cities or counties in order to meet their mitigation requirements. These hatcheries produce healthy fish to benefit the citizens of Washington while providing conservation to natural origin salmonids. Production of hatchery fish is critical for the majority of fishing opportunities throughout Washington – trout and anadromous salmon and steelhead fisheries rely on the presence of hatchery fish in our waterways. Additionally, production of salmon, specifically Chinook, is critical to the recovery of southern resident killer whales. Hatchery conservation programs contribute to protecting and preserving natural runs of salmon and steelhead. Hatchery programs also help us meet co-management plans and court ordered directives. The production of hatchery fish also requires facility maintenance of the system of 81 hatcheries owned or managed by the department.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 405.3 369.1 387.2
001 - General Fund
State 21,938,000 16,946,000 38,884,000
Federal 16,226,000 18,004,000 34,230,000
Local 15,161,000 14,963,000 30,124,000
001 - General Fund Totals 53,325,000 49,913,000 103,238,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 1,383,000 1,439,000 2,822,000
04M - Recreational Fisheries Enhancement
State 1,392,000 1,121,000 2,513,000
071 - Warm Water Game Fish Account
State 934,000 507,000 1,441,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 46,000 47,000 93,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 1,076,000 1,306,000 2,382,000
12G - Rockfish Research Account
Non-Appropriated 10,000 7,000 17,000
21S - Aquatic Invasive Species Mngmt Acct
State 1,000 1,000 2,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 5,643,000 5,700,000 11,343,000
259 - Coastal Crab Account
Non-Appropriated 2,000 2,000 4,000
444 - Fish & Wildlife Equipment Revolving
Non-Appropriated 542,000 544,000 1,086,000
507 - Oyster Reserve Land Account
State 24,000 24,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 405.3 369.1 387.2
GFS 21,938,000.0 16,946,000.0 38,884,000.0
Other 42,440,000.0 43,641,000.0 86,081,000.0
Totals 64,378,000.0 60,587,000.0 124,965,000.0
Expected Results

Fishing opportunities are maintained or increased, without adversely affecting wild salmon and steelhead. Fish production supports Washington’s sport and commercial fishing industry, creating economic activity and recreational opportunities throughout the state. Wild salmon and steelhead populations are stable or recovering. Native fish populations are recovering and hatchery operations do not adversely affect wild fish.

A051 - Manage Hunting Opportunities

WDFW’s wildlife population monitoring, protection and research help us ensure that wildlife populations will endure and provide future generations the opportunities to enjoy an abundant resource. These hunting opportunities, if protected in perpetuity, will promote a healthy economy; protect community character; maintain an overall high quality of life while delivering high-quality hunting experiences for the human populations we serve. In order to effectively manage hunting opportunities, the department surveys game populations and population trends, as well as health of the populations, sets sustainable hunting seasons, secures hunting access on private lands, provides opportunities for hunter education, responds to game wildlife conflicts and markets and sells hunting licenses. In order to sustainably manage hunting, the department maintains enforcement presence throughout the state to deter and address instances of poaching, ensure hunting safety and make sure that regulations, such as time, place and method of hunts, are upheld and statewide natural resources are protected.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 135.7 143.7 139.7
001 - General Fund
State 4,608,000 3,123,000 7,731,000
Federal 7,841,000 8,813,000 16,654,000
Local 349,000 346,000 695,000
001 - General Fund Totals 12,798,000 12,282,000 25,080,000
01B - ORV & Nonhighway Account
State 2,000 2,000 4,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 303,000 318,000 621,000
04M - Recreational Fisheries Enhancement
State 7,000 7,000 14,000
071 - Warm Water Game Fish Account
State 49,000 26,000 75,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 215,000 340,000 555,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 827,000 1,893,000 2,720,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
Local 6,000 6,000 12,000
14A - Wildlife Rehabilitation Account
State 3,000 3,000 6,000
19W - Wolf-Livestock Conflict Account
Non-Appropriated 6,000 6,000 12,000
217 - Oil Spill Prevention Account
State 1,000 4,000 5,000
21S - Aquatic Invasive Species Mngmt Acct
State 19,000 22,000 41,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 6,290,000 6,353,000 12,643,000
507 - Oyster Reserve Land Account
State 6,000 6,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 135.7 143.7 139.7
GFS 4,608,000.0 3,123,000.0 7,731,000.0
Other 15,924,000.0 18,139,000.0 34,063,000.0
Totals 20,532,000.0 21,262,000.0 41,794,000.0
Expected Results

Successful management of hunting opportunities will result in sustained healthy and abundant game species populations. Those populations will maintain hunting opportunities and outdoor quality of life, opportunities to harvest quality protein, boosts to local economies reliant on outdoor recreation and private lands access for hunting opportunities. Additionally, educational programs and enforcement of state regulations will promote public safety. Careful management will continue to allow Washington hunters the opportunity to hunt 10 big game species, 19 small game species and 42 migratory bird species. Hunters will have a convenient and simple way to understand and purchase their license options.

A052 - Provide Non-Consumptive Recreational Opportunities

Non-consumptive recreation passively benefits from all work of the department. WDFW promotes the opportunity to actively enjoy those passive benefits by working with local communities to develop and promote wildlife-viewing activities and festivals, providing wildlife web cameras featuring bald eagles, salmon, owls and more on its website, maintaining interpretive signs at select wildlife areas, and producing self-guiding pamphlets and birding trail maps. Additionally, WDFW promotes wildlife festivals, citizen science, bird watching, land-based whale watching, fish-migration viewing, beach combing, target shooting, outdoor learning, outdoor skill building, self-guided outdoor experiences, community-centric resources to interpret local wildlife and fish resources and active lifestyle opportunities that allow the public direct contact with wilderness and wild native places.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 5.5 5.4 5.5
001 - General Fund
State 369,000 143,000 512,000
Federal 34,000 38,000 72,000
Local 91,000 90,000 181,000
001 - General Fund Totals 494,000 271,000 765,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 23,000 24,000 47,000
04M - Recreational Fisheries Enhancement
State 149,000 150,000 299,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 5,000 5,000 10,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 1,000 1,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 425,000 661,000 1,086,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 61,000 62,000 123,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 5.5 5.4 5.5
GFS 369,000.0 143,000.0 512,000.0
Other 788,000.0 1,031,000.0 1,819,000.0
Totals 1,157,000.0 1,174,000.0 2,331,000.0
Expected Results

Through promotion of outdoor recreation, WDFW fosters a network of conservation partners, engaged communities, communications specialists and the public both in person and online. This network collaboratively supports wildlife viewing and wildlife-based outdoor recreation, fostering durable community-supported conservation solutions. These conservation solutions maintain and improve opportunities for future generations to experience Washington’s wildlife and fish resources firsthand, and contribute to a wildlife-based outdoor economy.

A053 - Business Management and Obligations

An effective agency requires administrative infrastructure that successfully supports the needs of staff who perform work directly in service to the mission. The department’s business management work comprehensively supports the entire agency and meets obligations by providing agency leadership and strategy, communicating with the public and legislature, managing finance and contracts, managing human resources, managing information technology infrastructure, building and maintaining office facilities, maintaining agency records, responding to public safety incidents (obligation to general policing by fully commissioned WDFW officers) and accessing legal counsel from the Office of the Attorney General.

Account FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTE 319.5 319.2 319.4
001 - General Fund
State 17,307,000 18,856,000 36,163,000
Federal 10,694,000 11,868,000 22,562,000
Local 5,598,000 5,558,000 11,156,000
001 - General Fund Totals 33,599,000 36,282,000 69,881,000
01B - ORV & Nonhighway Account
State 19,000 16,000 35,000
02R - Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account
State 986,000 1,038,000 2,024,000
071 - Warm Water Game Fish Account
State 424,000 893,000 1,317,000
07V - Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Reward
Non-Appropriated 98,000 101,000 199,000
098 - East Wash Pheasant Enhancement Acct
State 21,000 68,000 89,000
09J - WA Coast Crab Pot Buoy Tag Account
Non-Appropriated 6,000 8,000 14,000
104 - Limited Fish and Wildlife Account
State 4,816,000 6,139,000 10,955,000
110 - Special Wildlife Account
Local 89,000 228,000 317,000
12G - Rockfish Research Account
Non-Appropriated 15,000 14,000 29,000
14A - Wildlife Rehabilitation Account
State 14,000 14,000 28,000
19W - Wolf-Livestock Conflict Account
Non-Appropriated 30,000 30,000 60,000
217 - Oil Spill Prevention Account
State 41,000 81,000 122,000
21S - Aquatic Invasive Species Mngmt Acct
State 364,000 432,000 796,000
24N - Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Acc
State 8,829,000 8,924,000 17,753,000
259 - Coastal Crab Account
Non-Appropriated 7,000 7,000 14,000
320 - Puget Sound Crab Pot Buoy Tag Acct
Non-Appropriated 4,000 1,000 5,000
444 - Fish & Wildlife Equipment Revolving
Non-Appropriated 127,000 128,000 255,000
507 - Oyster Reserve Land Account
State 79,000 15,000 94,000
FY 2022 FY 2023 Biennium Total
FTES 319.5 319.2 319.4
GFS 17,307,000.0 18,856,000.0 36,163,000.0
Other 32,261,000.0 35,563,000.0 67,824,000.0
Totals 49,568,000.0 54,419,000.0 103,987,000.0
Expected Results

This work will result in: strong, clear agency direction and leadership; efficient agency internal operations and a skilled, productive workforce; compliance with various financial, technology and other laws and requirements; maximized value from investment in WDFW administrative operations; decreased agency financial risk; and compliance with all state, federal and local regulations regarding financial management, contracting, budget, human resources, records management, technology and technology security.