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Department of Ecology

  Average Annual FTEs Near General Fund State Other Funds Total Funds
  (Dollars in Thousands)
Current Budget 1,735.6 59,946 530,438 590,384
2019-21 Maintenance Level 1,735.6 59,971 532,816 592,787
Difference from 2017-19 0.0 25 2,378 2,403
% Change from 2017-19 0.0% 0.04% 0.45% 0.41%

2019-21 Policy Other Changes

Clean Energy 1.9 502 0 502
Support Voluntary Cleanups 2.0 0 668 668
Puget Sound Freshwater Monitoring 1.2 0 748 748
Small Communities WQ Assistance 0.60 0 350 350
Ecology Security System 0.0 56 386 442
Nutrient Controls for Puget Sound 1.2 0 535 535
Cleanup & Study PFAS Contamination 1.2 0 1,036 1,036
Support Rural Brownfields Cleanup 0.0 0 500 500
Homeless Encampments Waste Cleanup 0.0 0 4,000 4,000
Local Source Control Program 0.0 0 750 750
NWRO Relocation 0.0 270 1,872 2,142
Funding WCC Local Partnerships 7.7 0 3,658 3,658
GW Monitoring to Reduce Risks 1.5 0 378 378
Streamflow Restoration Fund Shift 0.0 310 (310) 0
Funding for Oil Spills Program 0.0 0 2,300 2,300
Safer Products Washington 0.60 0 479 479
Protecting State Waters 2.9 0 654 654
Ecology SEPA Analysis 1.2 0 600 600
Program Fund Shift / Toxics 0.0 (4,819) 4,819 0
Greenhouse Emission Limits 1.9 0 553 553
Zero Emission Vehicle Program 0.60 0 149 149
Clean Transportation Fuel Standards 3.9 1,458 0 1,458
GHG Emissions Evaluation 3.4 0 1,406 1,406
Transportation Network Companies 1.2 384 0 384
2019-21 Policy Other Changes Total 33.0 (1,839) 25,531 23,692

2019-21 Policy Comp Changes

PERS & TRS Plan 1 Benefit Increase 0.0 5 45 50
2019-21 Policy Comp Changes Total 0.0 5 45 50

2019-21 Policy Central Services Changes

Archives/Records Management 0.0 1 4 5
Attorney General 0.0 56 152 208
DES Central Services 0.0 3 21 24
OFM Central Services 0.0 50 366 416
2019-21 Policy Central Services Changes Total 0.0 110 543 653
Total Policy Changes 33.0 (1,724) 26,119 24,395
2019-21 Policy Level 1,768.6 58,247 558,935 617,182
Difference from 2017-19 33.0 (1,699) 28,497 26,798
% Change from 2017-19 1.9% (2.8%) 5.4% 4.5%

Policy Changes

Attorney General

Adjustments are made to reflect each agency's anticipated share of legal service charges from the Attorney General’s Office. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

DES Central Services

Adjustments are made to reflect each agency’s anticipated share of charges from the Department of Enterprise Services (DES) for campus rent, utilities, parking, and contracts; capital project surcharges; financing cost recovery; public and historic facilities; real estate services; risk management services; personnel service rates; the Perry Street child care center; small agency services; and the department’s enterprise applications. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

OFM Central Services

Adjustments are made to reflect each agency’s anticipated share of charges from the Office of Financial Management (OFM) for statewide financial applications, One Washington, and other OFM central services. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

Clean Energy

The 2019-21 budget provided partial funding for the Department of Ecology to implement the Clean Energy Act (Chapter 288, Laws of 2019), which transitions Washington's electric utilities to carbon neutrality starting in 2030. Additional funding allows the department to conduct required greenhouse gas content calculation rulemaking, establish emission rates for unspecific electricity, and develop energy transformation project requirements. The agency will conduct a lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis of waste management practices and participate in the transmission corridors work group. (General Fund - State)

Support Voluntary Cleanups

The department provides contaminated site owners with technical assistance and opinions on cleanup sufficiency through the Voluntary Cleanup Program. This encourages cleanup and facilitates redevelopment of contaminated properties. Program funding has not kept pace with demand for services, which has delayed or discouraged many voluntary cleanups. This additional funding will allow the department to provide timely assistance and regulatory closure to program participants. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Puget Sound Freshwater Monitoring

The Salish Sea is experiencing serious impacts from excess nutrient inputs, climate change, and ocean acidification. This funding will add capacity for continuous freshwater nutrient monitoring for dissolved oxygen, pH, nitrates, turbidity, temperature and conductivity, and targeted storm event sampling at the mouth of the seven largest rivers discharging into Puget Sound. The data collected will support a nutrient reduction strategy for Puget Sound and help inform decisions regarding the need for future infrastructure investments across the region. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Small Communities WQ Assistance

Small communities often lack the resources needed to meet federal Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan requirements for water quality infrastructure projects such as project and financial planning, environmental review, public process engagement, and long-term asset management. This funding will provide engineering and technical assistance to 15-20 small communities annually and provide training and outreach across the state to improve and protect investments in local clean water infrastructure. (Water Pollution Control Revol Admin - State)

Ecology Security System

The department's current key card access system is outdated and unable to meet current business and security needs. Funding is provided to purchase and install a new security system to ensure the safety of approximately 2,000 employees, tenants, support personnel, and contractors at nine agency facilities across the state and enable agency personnel to respond effectively to security incidents that may occur. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

Nutrient Controls for Puget Sound

Human sources of nutrients, which cause low dissolved oxygen, pose a threat to the health of Puget Sound. Recent modeling shows wastewater treatment plants significantly contribute excess nutrients into Puget Sound, and additional action is needed to better control this pollution. Funds are provided to develop a Puget Sound nutrients general permit for wastewater treatment plants to reduce nutrient pollution. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Cleanup & Study PFAS Contamination

Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS), a group of over 4,700 synthetic organic chemicals used in consumer and industrial applications, are widely detected in air, soil, water, remain in the environment for a long time and do not break down easily. To address the emerging concern about the impact of PFAS compounds in Washington's environment, funding is provided to build PFAS analytical capacity, sample wastewaters and biosolids at three municipal wastewater treatment facilities receiving industrial discharges. It will also provide cleanup technical assistance to communities impacted by PFAS contamination in their water supply systems. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Support Rural Brownfields Cleanup

Small local governments often lack the resources to address brownfield sites, abandoned or underutilized properties, whose redevelopment is inhibited by known or suspected environmental contamination. To facilitate cleanup and encourage reuse in these communities, one-time funding is included to offer assessment or limited cleanup of ten rural properties with high redevelopment potential. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Homeless Encampments Waste Cleanup

Washington's cities and counties often do not have adequate resources to address the health and environmental effects of homeless encampments in their communities. A total of $1.5 million is provided for the department to provide grants to local governments to remove solid, hazardous, and infectious waste generated by homeless encampments. In addition, $2.5 million is provided to remove surface debris generated by vacated homeless encampments on state-owned sites along the I-5 corridor. It is intended that this funding will be available in fiscal year 2021 and fiscal year 2022. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Local Source Control Program

Replacing one-time federal funding allows the Local Source Control Partnership to maintain its current level of service. The Department of Ecology provides funding to 21 local governments who provide hands-on technical and regulatory assistance to small businesses, helping them safely manage their hazardous waste to prevent spills, protect against stormwater pollution, and prevent injuries to employees. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

NWRO Relocation

The department is on track to relocate its Northwest Regional Office (NWRO) and co-locate with the Washington State Department of Transportation at its facility in Shoreline by June 30, 2021. However, only partial funding was provided in the 2019-21 biennial budget to complete this move. One-time funding to replace 20-30 year old furniture and ongoing annual lease costs beginning in fiscal year 2022 are provided. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

Funding WCC Local Partnerships

Additional private/local funding allows the Department of Ecology to continue meeting demand for increased use of crew time on private/local projects, maintain the Washington Conservation Corp's (WWC) current 388.5 members and staff, and prevent a reduction of 18 crews and 90 crewmembers. Continuing state WCC support allows WCC crews to remove invasive species and install native plants to improve habitat for fish and wildlife, increase access and safety by constructing or improving trails, reduce the risk of floods and wildfires through forest health management, and assist in disaster response. (General Fund - Local, General Fund - Private/Local)

GW Monitoring to Reduce Risks

Supporting efforts to reduce groundwater nitrate contamination in the Lower Yakima Valley aquifer, funding is provided to conduct groundwater monitoring of 170 groundwater wells. Groundwater monitoring will establish baseline conditions to effectively measure how improved management practices affect groundwater quality and help impacted communities make better decisions about how best to protect their drinking water supplies. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Reclamation Account - State)

Streamflow Restoration Fund Shift

Revenue collected to operate the streamflow restoration program established in Chapter 1, Laws of 2018 in response to the Hirst decision is significantly lower than projected. A fund shift allows the department to maintain the program's existing level of service. (General Fund - State, Watershed Restoration Enhance Acct - Non-Appropriated)

Funding for Oil Spills Program

Resources are necessary to replenish and stabilize two of the state's primary funding sources that support oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response work. A portion of operating expenses for increased oil spill prevention and preparedness work is shifted from the Oil Spill Prevention Account to the Model Toxics Control Operating Account. In addition, the prolonged and costly spill response at the former Olympia Brewery in Tumwater depleted the agency's resources available to respond if a large oil spill occurs this biennium. To ensure response capacity is available, $2.2 million is transferred one time from the Oil Spill Prevention Account to the Oil Spill Response Account and additional funding is provided in the Model Toxics Control Operating Account. Full funding is restored for firefighting and oil spill response equipment cache grants part of which was used to pay for increased costs of the Olympia Brewery spill. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Oil Spill Prevention Account - State, Oil Spill Response Account - State)

Safer Products Washington

The department will further reduce the impact and cost of dealing with toxics in consumer products by accelerating identification of safer alternatives and establishing a better understanding for how these alternatives may affect businesses and communities. Funding enhances implementation of the Pollution Prevention for Healthy People and Puget Sound Act passed in 2019. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Protecting State Waters

The federal government is taking a series of actions that change how states will implement the Clean Water Act Section 401 water quality certification process. These changes reduce from 360 days to 60 days the time states have to issue 401 certifications, and add new procedural requirements that could reduce Washington's authority to protect water quality. Additional staffing will help ensure the Department of Ecology can make certification decisions within the new 60-day requirement and avoid losing the state's authority to protect water quality. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Ecology SEPA Analysis

Funds are provided for a second supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) to complete analysis of the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, environmental impacts and potential mitigation of those impacts for a facility to manufacture and export methanol at the Port of Kalama. The second SEIS will supplement information included in the August 30, 2019, SEIS prepared by Cowlitz County and the Port of Kalama. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Program Fund Shift / Toxics

Expenditures are shifted on an ongoing basis from the General Fund to the Model Toxics Control Operating Account for activities in the Water Quality, Shorelines, Environmental Assistance, and Administration programs. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Greenhouse Emission Limits

In 2008, the state set targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These targets would have Washington reducing its emissions by 50 percent over 1990 levels by 2050. The most recent analysis by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change calls for reducing global net human-cause emissions by 45 percent from 2010 levels by 2030 and net zero emission by 2050 to limit warming to 1.5°C. Contingent upon passage of executive request legislation, the department will align Washington state emission targets with the latest scientific guidance. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Zero Emission Vehicle Program

The transportation sector is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Washington. To meet greenhouse gas reduction targets, we must aggressively electrify our transportation infrastructure and help residents of all incomes access zero emission vehicles and transit options. Contingent upon passage of legislation implementing a zero emission vehicle program to promote transition to electric vehicles, the department will work to ensure dealerships provide a greater range of electric and zero-emission vehicle options for consumers across the state. (Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Clean Transportation Fuel Standards

The transportation sector amounts to almost 45 percent of statewide greenhouse gas emissions. Contingent upon passage of legislation requiring the establishment of clean fuel standards, funding is provided to implement a clean fuel program to limit greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel sold in the state. (General Fund - State)

GHG Emissions Evaluation

Major energy facilities and other infrastructure projects must undergo rigorous environmental review in permitting, including review of climate impacts. Funds are provided for the department to adopt rules to strengthen and standardize the consideration of climate change risk, vulnerabilities and greenhouse gas emissions in environmental assessments for projects with significant environmental impacts. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State)

Transportation Network Companies

Transportation network companies, such as Uber, Lyft, and Grubhub, account for an increasing share of vehicle miles traveled. Contingent upon passage of legislation intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from ridesharing and application-based food delivery services operating within the state, the Department of Ecology will set emission reduction requirements and require service providers to develop and implement an emissions reduction plan. (General Fund - State)

PERS & TRS Plan 1 Benefit Increase

For eligible Public Employees' and Teachers' Retirement Systems Plan 1 members, this item provides an increase of 1.5 percent, up to a maximum of $22 per month. (General Fund - Federal, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State, other funds)

Archives/Records Management

Adjustments are made to reflect each agency’s anticipated share of state archiving and state records center costs from the Secretary of State’s Office. (General Fund - State, Model Toxics Control Operating Acct - State, Water Quality Permit Account - State)